After any areas repaired in the previous step are primed, we apply premium quality paints for a uniform finish. There are multiple finish options, including flat, matte, eggshell, satin, semi-gloss, and high-gloss, and we will have gone over the benefits of each with you beforehand so you can make an informed decision. The time will vary depending on the size of the job, but we will always ensure to work as quickly and efficiently as possible.
Even an old lamp with a bare bulb held close to a wall will make minor cracks, bumps or nail pops jump out. Carmen Toto, owner of C. Toto & Sons in Madison, New Jersey, uses painter's putty or a lightweight spackle for minor cracks and dents; he uses plaster of Paris for dents deeper than 1/8 inch. Instead of the standard tape-and-spackle method for bridging over recurring stress cracks, Maceyunas uses a rubberized spray-on primer called Good-Bye Crack. Damaged wood requires a slightly different approach. "Don't use spackle on wood," says Toto, "because it just won't stick." For damaged trim, he uses painter's putty or a two-part wood filler, such as Minwax's High Performance Filler. Smooth any repairs, bumps, and nibs with a drywall pole sander. For smoother walls and better adhesion, some of our pros sand all previously painted walls regardless of the shape they're in.
we only use the best interior paint which goes further as far as pricing a repaint we charge 2.00 a square foot floor space for walls ceilings and trim .on new construction using the best paint 3.90 per foot floor space that is with 3 coats on all surfaces but as being a professional for 45 years i recommend use a professional so that your paint will last longer and you wont have to pay to have it done more often i do free consulting in these areas i am more than happy to assist you with your projects 864-506-6666 just always remember good paint last longer and use a washable paint your home is your most valueable investment take care of it

O'Neil patches shallow holes and divots with Ready Patch because it dries fast, sands smooth, and stays flexible. Deep cracks and rotten spots are best repaired with two-step epoxies, such as those made by Advanced Repair Technology. (For a step-by-step instructions, see Repairing Rot with Epoxy.) The days of using polyester auto-body fillers on wood are over. "They cure too hard," says Portland, Oregon–based painting contractor Kathleen George. "They look good at first, but then they peel away."
Estimate: Short and sweet, but HIGHLY accurate. We wanted to use our own paint as there was a particular no VOC kind I wanted to use, and this was never an issue for them. They knew exactly how much we needed for the job based on the specs from the website of the company we were ordering it from, so we could order it without issue. The estimate was right inline with two other companies we received quotes from.
Sand the trim with a fine-grit sanding sponge. Sponges get into crevices where sandpaper can’t go and let you apply even pressure. Then apply the first coat of paint, let it dry at least 24 hours, lightly sand it again for a completely smooth surface, and apply the second coat. After each sanding, vacuum the trim, then wipe it down with a tack cloth to remove the dust.
Keep an eye on the new cans as they're being brought in. Make sure they look new and don't have paint in the rim of the can. If it's a five-gallon bucket, check to see whether the lid is still sealed on with the plastic strip. The only time it's acceptable to mix water in the paint is when you're using a deep or ultra deep base paint to reduce its stickiness, which is rare with new paint technology. Dark primary colors are composed almost entirely of tint that makes it very hard to work with without adding water.
A professional painter will help you select an exterior paint designed for long-lasting results, superior protection, and ample coverage. Higher quality paint requires fewer coats and lasts far longer, saving you money down the road. Oil or latex paints in a flat/matte or satin finish make excellent choices for the exterior of your home. These paints will endure extreme weather conditions, can be customized to your specific climate, and are ideal for painting siding.
When the primer is dry, caulk all small joints (less than ¼-inch-wide) in the siding and trim. Most pros use siliconized acrylics—paint won't stick to straight silicones—but Guertin and O'Neil like the new, more expensive urethane acrylics for their greater flexibility and longevity. O'Neil stresses that it's shortsighted to skimp on caulk. "If the joint fails, you're back to square one." Guertin uses the lifetime rating as his quality guide. "I don't expect 35-year caulk will last 35 years, but it should last longer than a 15-year caulk."
Safest way to ensure that everything is fair is to get it ALL in writing , signed by both parties. Specify each item that needs repair. Also, BUY the paint YOURSELF. That way, there is no incentive to water it down, and you KNOW that you are getting the grade/quality you actually purchased. Don't be penny wise and pound foolish; if you are paying to hire a painter, buy the best paint that you can afford, to ensure maximum life of this home improvement.
I've seen this article sent out 4 times now. It's out dated in terms of today's "Scams." Paint stores haven't charged more money for deeper paint colors in over 15 years. Also Water downed paint? Seriously? That would never happen in the real world. And Wall repair? what painter would ever not assume wall repair as included? This article is a waste of time and should be taken down or edited to reflect actual scams of todays times.
A painter's rod, or pole, can help you paint ceilings more quickly — no climbing up and down ladders required. And there's no need to stand directly underneath the area you are painting, so you won't catch every wayward splatter. A pole is also great for walls and floors. The pros were split over whether the 4- or 8-foot pole is best for everyday use, but they all agreed that a telescoping rod is the best bet.
Most of us can do an okay job of painting a room. But a seasoned professional does a great job. Obviously, pros have more experience than the average homeowner, but they also know techniques and tricks that make them better painters. We asked six pro painters to share those secrets. They probably kept a few tips to themselves, but they provided us with more than enough to help you work more efficiently and get better results. Some of what you'll read may surprise you. For instance, their secrets won't cut painting time. Painters spend two to four days on an average-size room. That's how long it takes to prep, prime and paint correctly. It's more work, but when you stand back to admire the results, you'll agree it's time well spent.
My friend already posted about this, but the incident is so outrageous it deserves two postings. On a lovely Sunday afternoon, we were out on a walk and waiting, patiently, on 65th and 1st for the east-west traffic to stop and allow us to cross. When the eastbound traffic was clear, a car heading west stopped to let us cross. Behind this law-abiding driver, heading west, was the Excel Home Painting van. The Excel driver immediately started honking at the car in front of him--you know, the one that stopped to allow pedestrians to cross--and then screaming and cursing at us, including calling us "f**king bitches and whores." Why? Because we were crossing the street. Really? Yes, really. Would you want someone who behaves like this in your home? Would you want to pay a company that hires someone like this? I hope not. Would you continue to employ someone who behaves like this? I hope not. There are plenty of good painters out there.
Second coats on similar colors are almost never recogicnized as being needed until the coat is applied and has dried. ONLY THEN WILL YOU SEE WHETHER IT NEEDS A SECOND COAT or not. Yes, painters can use a cheaper paint then what you paid for. That is solved by getting your own which, I would charge extra for because I will always have to go get more, or add second coat because home owner tried to skimp on paint, or they got the wrong color etc...
This is an area that interior painters can easily cut short to save time. Most contracts don't state the extent of the wall repairs included, so it's up to the painter's discretion how much they will do. If it seems like too much work, they'll usually point out the repairs but don't include it in the bid. They'll then ask you if you'd like it fixed after they start your project and let you know how much more it will cost.
Enforcement of this Act by the Painter-Stainers Company was sought up until the early 19th century, with master painters gathering irregularly to decide the fees that a journeyman could charge, and also instigating an early version of a job centre in 1769, advertising in the London newspapers a "house of call" system to advertise for journeymen and also for journeymen to advertise for work. The guild's power in setting the fee a journeyman could charge was eventually overturned by law in 1827, and the period after this saw the guild's power diminish, along with that of the other guilds; the guilds were superseded by trade unions, with the Operative United Painters' Union forming sometime around 1831.[2]

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